Sep, 17 Posted by Admin

Deadline – Elle Fanning has teamed up with Jessica Wapner, former science editor of Newsweek, for a documentary podcast series looking at the controversial diet pill and bodybuilding aid DNP.

The pair is working on One Click for Cadence13, the Entercom-backed podcast company. It is based on Wapner’s story for The Daily Beast – The Deadly Internet Diet Drug That Cooks People Alive that was published by in January 2020 and was commissioned by Vespucci Group, the film, TV, podcast & multimedia incubator that produces fact-based stories.

The Great star and exec producer Fanning will narrate the series, based on Wapner’s writing.

DNP is a chemical that was originally used in WWI-era artillery shells that has more recently been sold on the Internet as a diet pill and bodybuilding aid—with fatal results. Fanning and Wapner explore the issues of body image and mental health, and unravel these chain of events.

One Click is designed as a franchise with the story of DNP set as season one. The franchise will explore how a single click on the internet can change a life forever.

The first season of One Click will launch in early 2021.

One Click will be executive produced by Chris Corcoran, Chief Content Officer, Cadence13. It will be directed and produced by Cadence13 and Vespucci Group. Fanning, Wapner, and Brittany Kahan Ward will also produce.

“I am thrilled to be partnering with Cadence 13, Jessica Wapner and Vespucci Group on a podcast that I hope will start an important conversation amongst my peers,” said Fanning. “Our lives are consumed by social media and the internet, and we need to be conscious of the negativity it can breed and the ways in which it is being misused that are so harmful. I even find myself comparing my thighs to other people’s thighs on Instagram. Through Jessica’s investigation into DNP, a drug I had never heard of before, we hope to uncover and expose those preying on the vulnerable. This isn’t a chemistry story—it’s the story of 21-year-olds who burned alive from the inside trying to reach an intangible goal of what society’s beauty standards are today.”

Wapner added, “Moving this story from print to podcast will make for a far-reaching and in-depth examination of the many dire issues surrounding body image. Elle’s intelligence, openness and experience make her an ideal co-host. Vespucci Group’s collaborative spirit, dedication to journalism and storytelling skills make them the ideal producers, along with Cadence13.”

“We’re proud to be aligning with Elle and Jessica, two enormous talents who are clearly passionate about exploring the dangers of body image pressures and the risks people are willing to take, through the lens of this dark and terrifying story,” said Chris Corcoran, Chief Content Officer, Cadence13.

Fanning is represented by Echo Lake Entertainment, United Talent Agency, and Hansen Jacobson. Vespucci Group is represented by WME.



May, 7 Posted by Admin

VarietyElle Fanning has spent most of her 12-year career making movies. Now, at 22, she’s jumping into television, starring as Catherine the Great in Hulu’s 10-part satirical comedy series “The Great,” which debuts on May 15. Written by “The Favourite” scribe Tony McNamara, the show follows Catherine’s rise to power, from her arranged marriage to Peter III (Nicholas Hoult) to becoming empress of Russia in 1762 after having her husband assassinated.

“I didn’t know much about her. I knew the she-had-sex-with-a-horse propaganda,” Fanning says. “That’s what I knew about her, which is extremely sad. But I came to learn that she’s this kind of feminist icon, and she brought enlightenment to Russia and brought female education and art and science, and really did amazing things. She invented the roller coaster as well. She’s quite fun.”

What have you been doing during quarantine?

I’ve been with my sister [Dakota Fanning] and my mom and my grandmother cooking and baking a lot. My sister has been doing paint by numbers, and also this kind of bedazzling thing. Everyone’s embroidering. We’re getting creative. I’m doing a jigsaw puzzle of the “Top Gun” movie poster.

I love the paint by numbers.

She did a giant, a really big one of a flamingo. I got one. I haven’t done it, but it’s of spotted dogs.

Let’s talk about “The Great.”

It starts when Catherine is quite young, and she arrives in Russia. She’s extremely optimistic and open and romantic and slightly naive to what is about to happen to her life. She’s going to marry Peter, who is the emperor of Russia. She meets him, and he is definitely not anything that she thought he was going to be. Reality hits her in her face, and she quickly realizes that she needs to kill her husband for her life to be OK. We’re not here trying to give a history lesson to anyone, but there are elements in each episode that are true, slightly based on what Catherine did. It was a play that was put on in Australia that Tony had done years ago. Then it was going to possibly be a movie. I read the movie script that actually spanned much more of her life. It was her young, up until her death. Then there were talks of, “Hey, there’s so much information, TV is so hot right now, or whatever.” Let’s do a TV show. Tony asked if I would help kind of develop it with him and come on as a producer, which was huge for me. Also, I felt a lot like Catherine in finding my voice in that space as a young woman.

Read MoreIn your more intimate scenes with Nicholas, how did you not break with the words that were coming out of his mouth?

In the crazy sex scenes where he’s spewing nonsense and I’m just lying there, I would be literally munching on a pillow laughing so hard. We always wanted to make the scene funnier or better. For the good of the scene, we were trying to go for it. That was a big thing for me because it’s a comedy. I’m not used to comedies where it’s a specific rhythm and there are jokes. I had to learn to not be embarrassed. Throughout the months of filming, my walls kind of went down to be able to not be as embarrassed with myself.

And you got to wear some outfits.

That’s for sure — corsets! I’d be like, “My boobs aren’t big. What is this? What have they done? They look great, but wow.” [Laughs] But they do change your body, those corsets. You’ve heard so many actresses talk about it, but your body does change, even your breathing pattern, especially saying those long speeches.

I’m sure you and your sister have had plenty of scripts thrown your way. You finally decided on a project to do together, “The Nightingale,” about the French resistance during WWII. Why was this the right one for you? [Filming was postponed because of the pandemic, and Sony has slated the release for December 2021.]

I think it’s the right timing in our lives now. It’s really going to mean something because it’s not like we’re just super young doing it. Right now we’re women. Our relationship too is also more friends at this point because we’re only four years apart. When you’re young, your sisters and you are fighting all the time and stealing each other’s clothes. I’d heard about the book for a while, and it’d been kind of floating around for a bit. The book is so powerful. Also, we were curious: If we did something together, would we play sisters? Or would we not play sisters? People are like, “Well, you look similar.” We think we look nothing alike, but this is a true sister story. I can’t get through the script without sobbing.

You’re a producer on “The Great.” Do you want to direct next?

It’s something that I do want to do badly. You’ve just got to find the right story. What is it that you want to tell? Is it going to be personal? Is it not? Are you going to write it? Are you not? A lot of big questions. I will for sure one day.

This interview has been edited and condensed. Hear it in its entirety below.

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